Spring Election Voter Guide

Endorsement and Recommendation Process:

The MADSA Electoral Politics Working Group (EPWG) drafted an electoral platform that was approved by the chapter membership. We interviewed five Mayoral and School Board candidates and made endorsement recommendations based on their alignment with our platform. Endorsement required the support of 66% of members at a MADSA general meeting.

Endorsements

Madison DSA endorses Ananda Mirilli for school board seat 5. Ananda is running for school board to address racial inequities in public schools and is committed to resisting privatization, supporting organized labor in schools, and ending the ERO program. Ananda was the only candidate that fully aligned with MADSA’s platform.

Voter Guide

Wisconsin State Supreme Court

Brian Hagedorn, a self-described "soldier in the culture war" is Scott Walker's former chief counsel and co-founder of a private elementary school that discriminates against LGTBQ students He helped design Act 10, which decimated public sector unions.

Lisa Neubauer is supported by 300 judges, 45 DAs, 20 Sheriffs. As far as we can tell, she has made no statements about bail reform, overcrowded prisons, racial inequities in prisons, or abuse of prisoners. She has been endorsed by the AFL-CIO.

Madison Mayor

Satya Rhodes-Conway was interviewed by Madison Area DSA for an endorsement and aligned with much of our platform:

People First Transportation:
  • Will aggressively expand transit in Madison and believes that fare-free transportation can be a part of this expansion, but will need to be phased in to demonstrate financial viability.
Housing Justice:
  • Has a great deal of experience in housing policy and believes that a multi-pronged approach of expanded housing opportunities alongside additional tenant resources will help to alleviate the current housing crisis.
Equitable Schools:
  • Believes that the racialized outcomes of the ERO program are unacceptable and that the city can find alternative ways to ensure school safety.
Treatment, Not Incarceration:
  • Supports expanding restorative justice programs. Wants to end prison-entrapping practices like bail and restrictive parole conditions. Satya believes that Madison should be working to set policies that prioritize treatment over criminalization.

Paul Soglin, the incumbent, declined to participate in the MADSA endorsement process. His campaign website has no issue page. Real estate developers who conduct business with the city are the dominant donors to Soglin’s reelection campaign (summary here and here). An ethics complaint has been filed claiming he helped commercial property owners (including campaign donors) maintain unreasonably low property tax assessments.

Madison School Board Seat 3

Kaleem Caire laudably advocates for addressing racial disparities in schools, but has a long record of promoting charter schools and school privatization.

Cris Carussi is an active supporter of public education and rejects privatization as a solution to school inequalities. She has made no public statements about ERO program.

Madison School Board Seat 4

Ali Muldrow spoke with MADSA about her work as an unparalleled advocate for LGBTQ youth in schools and has an impressive platform to transform and strengthen public education. Her goal is to have no black kids in prison, but stops short of calling for end to the ERO program.

David Blaska is a former county supervisor and right wing blogger. We chose not to interview him and hope that you do not vote for him.

Madison School Board Seat 5:

Ananda Mirilli: Madison DSA endorses Ananda Mirilli for school board seat 5. Ananda is running for school board to address racial inequities in public schools and is committed to resisting privatization, supporting organized labor in schools, and ending the ERO program. Ananda was the only candidate that fully aligned with MADSA’s platform.

TJ Mertz is running for a third-term after running twice unopposed. He supports public education and teachers, but has a mixed record regarding police in schools and community involvement. Mertz repeatedly walked out of meetings when students of color brought testimony. He recommends maintaining a modified police-in-schools program.

Voting Resources in Madison

Voter Registration: You can find information about registering to vote at the Wisconsin Elections Commission MyVote site.

Early Voting:

  • In Madison: The City of Madison maintains early voting locations throughout the community, including public libraries. Most locations are open for early voting through March 31st.

Vote Absentee: You can request an absentee ballot by mail or email by Thursday, February 14th. More details are available at the Madison City Clerk’s website.

Vote on April 2nd: Find your polling location through the Wisconsin Elections Commission website.

Voter-compliant ID: Make sure to bring a voter-compliant ID to the polls, you can find information through the Madison City Clerk and Wisconsin Election Commission. UW-Madison students note that your WiscCard is not a voter-compliant ID, however you can request one from the WiscCard office.

Voting Accessibility: By law, all polling places must be accessible to voters with disabilities. For more information on available accommodations, click here.